Course Guide

Pharmaceutical Product Development Program


Core Courses


Capstone


PPD 481
3 Credits
The first course in a three-semester sequence provides an overview of the pharmaceutical industry and the drug development process, followed by an in-depth study of the clinical trials portion of the process. Statistical design used in trials for demonstrating drug safety and efficacy are discussed. The role of IRBs, informed consent, and other medical legal issues are explored.
Typically offered in Spring.
PPD 482
3 Credits
A course emphasizing pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic aspects of drugs. Sites and mechanisms of drug reaction and drug metabolism are discussed. Drug toxicology is also explored in depth. Laboratory therapeutic drug monitoring as a measure of improving drug efficacy is considered.
Typically offered in Fall.
PPD 483
3 Credits
This course emphasizes the discovery portion of drug development and illustrates the major concepts in medicinal chemistry. The scientific tools used such as high throughput screening, genomics and computational chemistry, are considered. Criteria for making a compound workable as a drug are discussed, and the selection of the administration route is reviewed.
Typically offered in Spring.
PPD 484
1 Credit
A summer, paid internship experience with a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company. These internships are designed to provide experiences in key aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. Students will be supervised jointly by an on-site professional scientist and a member of the Pharmaceutical Product Development Program Committee.
Typically offered in Summer.
PPD 485
1 Credit
A second summer paid internship experience with a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company. These internships are designed to provide experiences in key aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. This experience will be designed to complement the experience gained from PPD 484.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
PPD 490
1 Credit
This special topics course is designed to offer in depth seminars about novel and exciting areas of research in the field of pharmaceutical product development and drug discovery. Invited speakers will be industry experts presenting the most up-to-date information about their areas of expertise.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
PPD 535
3 Credits
Through the use of case studies, the student will learn the role of the chemist in drug discovery and development. Specifically, target initiation, competitive surveillance, lead discovery and optimization, counterscreens for selectivity, pharmacokinetics, selection criteria for entering development and synthetic optimization will be elucidated.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

Chemistry


CHE 103
3 Credits
Basic laws and theories of chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonding, oxidation-reduction, solutions, and ionic equilibria. Correlations of chemical principles and their application to modern descriptive chemistry.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
CHE 104
3 Credits
Basic laws and theories of chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonding, oxidation-reduction, solutions, and ionic equilibria. Correlations of chemical principles and their application to modern descriptive chemistry.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CHE 231
4 Credits
A unified conceptual introduction to organic molecular structure. Topics discussed will include structure of the atom, orbital and molecular bonding theory, nomenclature of classes of molecules, elementary molecular orbital theory, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, resonance, and acid-base concepts. These concepts will be applied to the chemistry of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and simple systems.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CHE 232
3 Credits
A survey of the classes of organic reaction from a mechanistic deductive approach. Topic will include nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution, reaction of carbonyl compounds, elimination, aromatic substitution, molecular rearrangements, oxidation reduction reactions, carbanion and amine chemistry. These reactions are applied to the remaining classes of organic compounds not covered in Organic Chemistry I.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CHE 476
3 Credits
This course examines the physical and chemical characteristics of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. The bioenergetics of carbohydrate and fat metabolism and the enzymatic control of these processes is a focal point. The bioenergetics of carbohydrate and fat metabolism and the enzymatic control of these processes is a focal point. Nucleic acids in protein synthesis is also covered.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CRL 103
1 Credit
Basic laboratory studies in college chemistry utilizing the quantitative approach. Semimicro qualitative analysis and inorganic preparations.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CRL 104
1 Credit
Basic laboratory studies in college chemistry utilizing the quantitative approach. Semimicro qualitative analysis and inorganic preparations.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CRL 231
2 Credits
Basic laboratory skills in organic chemistry including classical as well as instrumental techniques. Organic synthesis and modern spectrophotometric methods of identification.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

Biology


BIO 110
3 Credits
The concepts general to all living organisms such as cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course is designed for majors in biology and related scientific areas.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
BIO 214
4 Credits
The biology of microorganisms, their structure, physiology, and control; the nature and dynamics of disease and disease control; principles of food, industrial, and environmental microbiology. The laboratory will deal with microbiological techniques, isolation and identification of microbes, and water and food analysis.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
BIO 220
3 Credits
An introduction to cellular and molecular biology with emphasis on cell morphology, biochemistry, and cell physiology.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
BIO 230
3 Credits
Nature of genetic material and its qualitative and quantitative variation: recombination; interaction of gene products; regulation of genetic material; and its role in evolution.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
BIO 367
3 Credits
An introduction to the mechanism of action of prototype drugs. The physiological alterations produced by various drugs as well as interactions between drug classes will be emphasized.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 469
4 Credits
Theoretical and applied principles of the physiology of humans presented from an organ-system approach. Emphasis is placed on homeostatic regulatory mechanisms. May not be taken as a biology major elective.
Typically offered in Fall.
BIO 333
2 Credits
An introduction to laboratory techniques for molecular biology including restriction enzyme digests, gel electrophoresis, gene cloning in E. coli, RNA and DNA isolation, and polymerase chain reaction.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

Math


MAT 161
4 Credits
Differential and integral calculus of real-valued functions of a single real variable with applications.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
MAT 121
3 Credits
Introduction to statistics and statistical inference. Concepts include: descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, along with a formal introduction to linear regression and categorical data analysis. Statistical software including, but not limited to SPSS and Excel, will be used to facilitate the understanding of important statistical ideas and for the implementation of data analysis in many areas of application.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter.
MAT 145
3 Credits
An overview of differential and integral calculus, motivated through biological problems. Topics include mathematical modeling with functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, optimization, and integration. Graphing calculators are used as an aid in the application of calculus concepts and methods to realistic biological problems.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
MAT 143
3 Credits
An intuitive approach to calculus with emphasis on conceptual understanding and applications to business. Topics include differentiation, curve-sketching, optimization, integration, and partial derivatives.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

Other


PHY 130
4 Credits
An introductory, noncalculus, physics course. Mechanics of solids and fluids, wave motion, heat and temperature, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
PHY 140
4 Credits
Physics 140 is a continuation of Physics 130, which covers electricity, magnetism, electrical circuits, optics, and quantum physics.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
STA 311
3 Credits
Course will give students the ability to manage and manipulate data effectively, conduct basic statistical analysis, and generate reports and graphics primarily using the SAS Statistical Software Program.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
ENG 371
3 Credits
Instruction in the forms and techniques of written, oral, and visual communication currently practiced in the scientific and technical professions. A series of coordinated assignments leads to a final project in the student's field of professional study.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
PHI 371
3 Credits
A case based approach to the study of philosophical concepts and ethical criteria as applied to health care practice and clinical research.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
ECO 112
3 Credits
Principles underlying use and allocation of scarce productive resources. Consumption and production activities. Value, price, and income distribution. Considerations of economic efficiency and welfare.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

Electives


Chemistry


CHE 321
3 Credits
Fundamental principles of analytical chemistry. Theory of gravimetric and volumetric methods of analysis.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CRL 321
2 Credits
Practical experience in modern techniques of chemical analysis with emphasis on volumetric and gravimetric methods.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CHE 333
3 Credits
An advanced mechanistic study of organic compounds, functional groups, and their reactions. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules will also be covered.
Typically offered in Fall.
CHE 345
3 Credits
A survey of the fundamental topics in physical chemistry with applications to biology and medicine. Primarily for biology, chemistry-biology, and preprofessional majors.
Typically offered in Spring.
CHE 424
3 Credits
Basic principles of applied instrumental analysis. Special emphasis on the use of spectrophotometric and electroanalytical instrumentation.
Typically offered in Spring.
CHE 436
3 Credits
Polymerization kinetics, rheology of polymer melts, crystallization parameters, and monomer reactivity in copolymerization.
Typically offered in Spring.
CHE 479
3 Credits
A one-semester course in the environmental and physiological aspects of chemical toxicity. Special emphasis will be placed on documentation, sampling, and verification of materials.
Typically offered in Spring.
CRL 424
2 Credits
Practical experience in the choice and application of instrumental methods of analysis to chemical systems.
Typically offered in Spring.
CRL 436
2 Credits
Synthesis of polymers; molecular, physical, and thermal characterization of polymers. Instrumental methods include X-rays, IR, electron microscopy, and thermal analysis.
CRL 476
2 Credits
Laboratory exercises in the fundamentals of biochemistry.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CRL 477
2 Credits
An advanced laboratory course in biochemistry. This course is a practical application of biochemical principles, methods used in forensic DNA typing, and drug metabolite analysis in toxicological matrices.
CHE 271
3 Credits
This course is a precursor to CHE 371 and its purpose is to introduce students to forensic science and its various disciplines. Students will also discuss professional practices and ethical expectations of a forensic scientist. The course content is designed for chemistry and physical chemistry majors with special emphasis on developing foundational scientific writing skills needed for upper level courses.
Typically offered in Spring.
CHE 341
4 Credits
An introduction to physical chemistry including ideal gases, kinetic theory, three laws of thermodynamics, introduction to phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, application of the fundamental equation of thermodynamics, transport phenomena, chemical kinetics, introductory spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and the structure of solids.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
CHE 342
3 Credits
Advanced thermodynamics including nonideal gases, nonideal systems, and thermodynamics at surfaces; introduction to statistical mechanics; quantum chemistry; advanced chemical kinetics, including kinetics near equilibrium, catalytic kinetics, and activated complex theory; and dynamic electrochemistry.
Typically offered in Spring.
CHE 477
3 Credits
This course is an extension of CHE 476 and considers the biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. The primary focus is on the interrelationship of these molecules and the pathways involving their metabolism.
Typically offered in Spring.
CHE 535
3 Credits
Through the use of case studies, the student will learn the role of the chemist in drug discovery and development. Specifically, target initiation, competitive surveillance, lead discovery and optimization, counterscreens for selectivity, pharmacokinetics, selection criteria for entering development and synthetic optimization will be elucidated.
Typically offered in Spring.
CRL 341
2 Credits
Laboratory course in physical chemistry including computer applications, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and spectroscopy.
Typically offered in Fall.

Biology


BIO 217
3 Credits
Principles of animal biology. Form and function of vertebrate and invertebrate animal types.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
BIO 307
3 Credits
An integrated study of the processes involved in the total body systemic complex as it changes from the ordered homeostatic condition to the imbalanced diseased state. The use of disease models, with clinical considerations, strengthens the concepts.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
BIO 314
4 Credits
Systematic study of pathogenic bacteria with extensive laboratory experience in handling and identifying these organisms.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 334
4 Credits
A course on the genetics of bacteria, their viruses, plasmids, and transposable elements. Applications of microbial genetics in genetic engineering and biotechnology.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 357
4 Credits
Comparative study of the principal organ systems of vertebrates as to their structure, function, and evolutionary relationships.
Typically offered in Fall.
BIO 421
4 Credits
A lecture and laboratory course that studies the molecular basis of cellular life. Eukaryotic cell structure and function will be emphasized.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 428
3 Credits
A study of the microscopic structure and function of vertebrate tissues and organs.
Typically offered in Fall.
BIO 431
3 Credits
A second course in genetics, covering the molecular biology of genetic events. Emphasis will be on the molecular details of basic genetic processes, such as DNA replication and transcription, RNA translation and protein synthesis, the genetic code, molecular mechanisms of gene regulation, and an introduction to biotechnology.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
BIO 454
3 Credits
An introductory course including a general study of the biology of fungi and a survey of the field of medical mycology.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 456
3 Credits
Molecular biology of bacterial, plant, and animal viruses; virus classification, ultrastructure, mechanisms of replication, and effects of virus infection on host cell.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 464
4 Credits
Physiology and biochemical variations seen in prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 465
4 Credits
Immunoglobulin structure and function, nature of antigens, cell-mediated immunity, hypersensitivity, regulation of immunity, and immunological diseases. Laboratory experience in immunological techniques.
Typically offered in Fall & Summer.
BIO 467
3 Credits
An integrative look at the physiology of the mammalian endocrine system in the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. The pathology associated with hormonal imbalance will be included.
Typically offered in Fall.
BIO 484
3 Credits
A general study of the epidemiology of both infectious and noninfectious diseases, including industrial and environmentally related health problems.
Typically offered in Fall.
BIO 259
4 Credits
An introduction to human structure and function. Skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems are emphasized. Laboratory involves study of human development and gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. May not be taken as a biology major elective.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
BIO 269
4 Credits
Continuation of BIO 259. Endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, immune, digestive, and urogenital systems emphasized. May not be taken as a biology major elective.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
BIO 310
3 Credits
The design, statistical analysis, graphical display and presentation of biological research.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
BIO 414
3 Credits
This course traces both the historical and current applications of microbiology in industry and society. Topics covered during lectures include building and equipment design, microbiological safety, fermentation, waste treatment, compost, and food production. The course also features guest lectures from several practicing microbiologists involved in industry.
Typically offered in Fall.
BIO 440
3 Credits
A detailed survey of the principles of human heredity. Examines the impact of genetics on current issues in human medicine, pharmacology, evolution, and sociology, and evaluates ethical issues surrounding these topics.
Typically offered in Spring.
BIO 443
3 Credits
Theory and practical application of RNA methodologies used in gene expression.
Typically offered in Spring.

Math


MAT 162
4 Credits
Continuation of MAT 161 including the study of series, methods of integration, transcendental functions, and applications to the sciences.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
MAT 261
4 Credits
The calculus of several variables. Topics include polar coordinates, vectors and three-dimensional analytic geometry, differentiation of functions of several variables, multiple integrals, and line and surface integrals.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
MAT 421
3 Credits
Probability; discrete distributions; continuous distributions; mathematical expectation; moment generating functions; bivariate distributions; distributions of functions of random variables. Use of appropriate technology.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
MAT 422
3 Credits
Order statistics; point estimation; interval estimation; tests of statistical hypotheses; statistics power; least squares regression. Use of appropriate technology.
Typically offered in Spring.

Other


STA 200
3 Credits
Continuation of MAT 121/MAT 125. Inference about the means, standard deviations and proportions, goodness of fit, analysis of variance, regression analysis, correlation, and nonparametric tests
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
STA 319
3 Credits
This course will cover simple and multiple linear regression methods and linear time series analysis with an emphasis on fitting suitable models to data and testing and evaluating models against data.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
MKT 250
3 Credits
This course will discuss the strategic importance of marketing to for-profit and non-profit organizations. Several key aspects of marketing will be reviewed, such as consumer behavior, personal selling, product positioning, pricing, market segmentation, B2B, B2C, services, advertising, sales promotion, direct and indirect channels of distribution, new product development, and retention of customers.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
ECO 111
3 Credits
National income and its measurement. The determination of price levels, output, and employment. Money and credit, expenditures, and economic stability. Government fiscal and monetary policy.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
ECO 370
3 Credits
This course will apply the basic tools of economics analysis to the various components of the health care system. Relying on microeconomic principles, we will study the behavior of participants (consumers, providers, insurers) in the health care industry. We will address some key policy issues that surround the provision of health care, as well as considering different health systems.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
HEA 377
2 Credits
An in-depth study of various drug categories including drug-dose response and principles of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion.
Typically offered in Spring.
BLA 201
3 Credits
Examines the framework of the American legal system and its impact on the environment in which business operates. Sources of law, including constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common law principles, that define the relationships between government and business; buyers and sellers of goods and services; and employers and employees are discussed.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.